3 tips for recruiters who want to lower first-year attrition rates

Published On: Oct 1, 2018
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Healthcare has one of the highest turnover rates of any industry in the U.S. According to Becker's Hospital Review, the average turnover rate for healthcare jobs was 20.6 percent in 2017. Considering the heavy cost of turnover, employers have to do something to improve retention rates. Here are three strategies to consider:


1. Reevaluate your job descriptions


Job descriptions are extremely important to the hiring process, yet are so often neglected. A quick list of the positions' responsibilities and requirements is not enough to draw in top talent. First, a description should accurately portray the position - including daily tasks, required skills and any other pertinent information. If people are hired, then find out there are many more responsibilities than described, they will be more likely to leave. Second, descriptions should detail the benefits of the position. Competitive salaries, benefits and perks should be on display to attract top talent.


2. Be transparent about opportunities for growth


Uncertainty about the future can cause workers to feel anxious and therefore more likely to seek out another opportunity. To combat this challenge, recruiters and hiring managers should explain to hires how they can advance their career at the organization. In fact a report from Gallup revealed that 59 percent of millennials say growth opportunities are extremely important to them when applying for work. By defining a path at the beginning of the relationship, recruits will be less anxious about their future.

Clear opportunities for career growth may encourage employees to stay with your organization.Clear opportunities for career growth may encourage employees to stay with your organization.




3. Offer flexible hours


We live in a hectic world, and jobs that require strict schedules and inflexible work/life balance aren't likely to attract top talent. Flexible schedules allow workers to achieve their personal goals as well as their professional ambitions. This sentiment was corroborated by a study conducted by the MIT Center for Work, Family & Personal Life, which found that 80 percent of employees believe flexibility contributes to retention. Flexible schedules and work locations can make life easier for workers, making them less likely to seek employment elsewhere.

Tracking and analyzing retention data could reveal deeper insights into why employees depart their positions within the first year of employment. Leveraging recruiting data may reveal patterns that aid the decision-making process.

To learn more about healthcare recruiting trends, visit our resource center today. Considering the heavy cost of turnover, employers have to do something to improve retention rates. Here are three strategies to consider: