MATERNAL-FETAL MEDICINE

Location
New York City, New York
Posted
Feb 01, 2021
Closes
Feb 28, 2021
Ref
77781
Profession
Physician

Preparing for a Career Break

Johns Hopkins

MATERNAL-FETAL MEDICINE

SPECIALISTS PROVIDE ADVANCED MANAGEMENT AND CARE FOR CARDIAC CONDITIONS

Our maternal-fetal medicine specialists offer state-of-the-art diagnostic, counseling and management services for maternal and fetal heart conditions — from the simple to the most complex.

 CardioObstetrics Clinic

First Trimester Fetal Echocardiography Program

Fetal Therapy Interventions

Our multidisciplinary team offers expert care for women facing severe cardiovascular complications, including maternal complex congenital heart defects, aortopathy, valvular disease, and cardiomyopathy both antenatally and postpartum. We offer a combined management strategy, with two maternal-fetal medicine faculty dual-boarded in critical care working alongside cardiologists who specialize in women’s health and adult congenital heart disease.

The Johns Hopkins Center for Fetal Therapy offers first trimester fetal echocardiography between 11 and 14 weeks gestation for patients at high risk for congenital heart defects due to maternal medical history or a prior child with a congenital heart defect, maternal pre-gestational diabetes, IVF conception of twins, or abnormal first trimester screening ultrasound. Our ability to provide an early, accurate and comprehensive diagnosis facilitates the full spectrum of management choices for our patients.

Our Center leads in clinical and safety outcomes by treating fetal anomalies with advanced prenatal surgical techniques. We offer specialized therapies for a growing number of conditions, including twin-twin transfusion syndrome, fetal airway obstruction, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, spina bifida and congenital cardiac disease.

To refer a patient to one our maternal-fetal medicine specialists, please call 410-955-1421. If you are caring for a patient facing a complex fetal diagnosis, call 844-JH-FETAL (844-543-3825) and speak directly with a physician.

hopkinsmedicine.org/GYNOB